17 November 2020

The Best Way to Have a Good Holiday

 

how to have a good holiday, blog post, aspasia s. bissas, this holiday pledge to give books, books, reading, support authors, support bookstores, aspasiasbissas.com

And don’t forget to spend time reading books too 🙂

Looking for books to give or read? I’ve got you covered…

 

Love Lies Bleeding by Aspasia S. Bissas, Blood Magic by Aspasia S. Bissas, Tooth & Claw by Aspasia S. Bissas, books, free books, vampire, vampires, dark fantasy, gothic, urban fantasy, paranormal, supernatural, strong female protagonist, aspasiasbissas.com 

Love Lies Bleeding: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books
FREE Blood Magic: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books
FREE Tooth & Claw: Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Apple Books 

 If you prefer a good paperback to an ebook, use this link to order Love Lies Bleeding from Bookshop – a portion of each sale goes directly to independent bookstores, as well as to myself. Thank you for supporting indie! ♥

 

Cheers,

AspasĂ­a S. Bissas

This post originally appeared on my official website. Be sure to follow me so you'll never miss a post.

31 October 2020

Happy Halloween


 

Stay safe this Halloween... but not too safe 🎃

Cheers,

AspasĂ­a S. Bissas

 

30 October 2020

Book Quote


 

Have you read and enjoyed any of my books? If so, please leave a rating and/or review!

Tooth & Claw

Goodreads

Amazon

Download FREE

Love Lies Bleeding

Goodreads

Amazon

Download

Order Paperback (When you use this link, a portion of each sale goes directly to independent bookstores, as well as to myself.)

Blood Magic

Goodreads

Amazon

Download FREE

Feel free to leave a rating/review on any other book sites too!

Thanks for supporting authors ♥

Cheers,

AspasĂ­a S. Bissas

26 September 2020

The Most Fiendish Vampire

 

The Most Fiendish Vampire, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas, bunnicula, vampire rabbit, vegetarian vampire, international rabbit day, rabbit, rabbits, bunny, bunnies, aspasiasbissas.com
Photo by Mati Mango on Pexels.com

Today is International Rabbit Day, a day to honour and learn about rabbits, both domestic and wild. In that vein (see what I did there?), I thought I’d post about the most fiendish vampire of all: Bunnicula!

The Most Fiendish Vampire, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas, bunnicula, vampire rabbit, vegetarian vampire, international rabbit day, rabbit, rabbits, bunny, bunnies, aspasiasbissas.com

Outwardly appearing like any other pet rabbit, Bunnicula strikes terror in the hearts of other pets as he roams the house in the dead of night, draining vegetables of their vital juices!

The Most Fiendish Vampire, blog post by Aspasia S. Bissas, bunnicula, vampire rabbit, vegetarian vampire, international rabbit day, rabbit, rabbits, bunny, bunnies, aspasiasbissas.com

Can anything stop Bunnicula? Only time will tell…

Okay, Bunnicula is more fluffy than fiendish, but he’s still one of my favourite vampires (from a cherished children’s book series of the same name).

Are you a Bunnicula fan? What’s your favourite rabbit fact? Share in the comments…

Read more about Bunnicula here.

Learn more about rabbits here and here.

Read more vampires by downloading my books (no bunnies, alas)!

Love Lies Bleeding by Aspasia S. Bissas, Blood Magic by Aspasia S. Bissas, Tooth & Claw by Aspasia S. Bissas, books, free books, vampire, vampires, dark fantasy, gothic, urban fantasy, paranormal, supernatural, strong female protagonist, aspasiasbissas.com

12 August 2020

Vampire's Garden: Comfrey

 

comfrey
Photo via Mary’s Heirloom Seeds
Love Lies Bleeding‘s readers know that main character Mara is both a vampire and a botanist. Trained in botany and herbalism when she was still human, she continues to study plants and have a garden. This post is second in a series exploring Mara’s plants. Are you interested in botany, gardening, or plant lore? So are some vampires…

Please note: Medicinal uses are given for informational purposes only. Always consult a medical professional before diagnosing or treating yourself or anyone else.

Latin Name: Symphytum officinale

Common Names: Boneset, Bruisewort, Knitbone, Slippery Root

History: Native to Europe and parts of Asia, comfrey has a long history (at least 2000 years) in healing. It has been used to treat coughs and lung ailments, stop excessive bleeding, treat stomach problems, and to ease joint pain and inflammation. Its most common use, however, has been to heal wounds, bruises, and broken bones; in fact, almost every name (in all languages) for comfrey refer to knitting or mending bones or healing cuts and contusions. "Comfrey" comes from a Latin word meaning "to grow together," and the botanical name "Symphytum" comes from the Greek, meaning plant that knits bones together. It was once also used as food for both people and animals.

Caution: Comfrey has been found to be toxic to the liver when taken internally in large amounts. It's generally safe to use externally, but is best avoided by pregnant and nursing women, infants, and by people with liver, kidney, or vascular disease. It's also toxic to animals, so be sure not to let them eat it.

Victorian Language of Flowers Meaning: Home sweet home

Cultivation: Perennial in zones 4 to 9. Easy to grow from seed, comfrey prefers full to part sun and rich, well-drained soil. It's quite adaptable and can survive less-than-ideal conditions, including drought. Sow early indoors or outside as soon as soil can be worked. Sow just below surface of soil and tamp down--keep seeds moist (not wet). Sow seeds or seedlings with 2 feet (60 cm) of space around them as the plants get fairly large. Once plants are established in a spot they can live for decades and be difficult to remove, so take care when selecting a site. Comfrey is generally non-invasive, although it can self sow.

Uses: Comfrey is still used externally to treat inflammation, joint pain, and closed wounds and bruises. You can crush fresh leaves to make a poultice, apply fresh leaves to the affected area, use a salve, or apply oil that has had comfrey steeped in it. Treat poison ivy blisters by rubbing a fresh leaf on them. You can also use the chopped roots to make salves, ointments, and oils (or use a combination of leaves and roots). Leaves are best used before the plant blooms; roots are best harvested in late autumn or early winter.

In the garden, nitrogen- and potassium-rich comfrey leaves are used as fertilizer, in compost, and as mulch. Avoid using stems as they can take root and spread the plant where you don't want it. You can also make a compost tea with the chopped leaves by steeping them in water for several weeks and then straining and diluting the resulting dark liquid 12:1 before applying to the garden.

Mara's Uses: She makes a poultice of comfrey leaves to help speed up healing of a particularly bad injury. Comfrey would be one of the herbs used to make salves and oils for her apothecary business.

Originally posted on AspasiaSBissas.com

 

Books by Aspasia S. Bissas

Love Lies Bleeding: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books, Amazon
Blood Magic: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books
Tooth & Claw: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books

If you prefer a good paperback to an ebook, order Love Lies Bleeding from Bookshop – a portion of each sale goes directly to independent bookstores, as well as to myself. Thank you for supporting indie! ♥

 

Further Reading:

Permaculture Research Institute

Natural Living IdeasNatural Living Ideas

Comfrey Growing Guide

Mother Earth News

WebMD

Wikipedia

 

Cheers,

AspasĂ­a S. Bissas

 

 

15 June 2020

6 Words About Vampires

bela

As a writer, I love words. As a vampire fan, I write about vampires. It seems natural to combine it all into one post: I bring you words about vampires.


[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELiMNHVgB5w?rel=0&w=560&h=315]

Sanguisuge (n) is a new word to me. It means bloodsucker, or leech. From Latin sanguisuga, from sanguis (blood) + sugere (to suck). Wikionary says it's obsolete but I think it's due for a comeback.

Related: "Sanguisugent," (adj) blood sucking or blood thirsty.



revenant

You may have heard vampires occasionally referred to as revenants. The word was coined in 1814 by Laetitia Matilda Hawkins in Rosanne:

"'Well, but what is it? What do you call it in French?' 'Why, revenant, to be sure. Un revenant.'" (p. 260)



lamia

From Greek lamia "female vampire, man-eating monster," literally "swallower, lecher," from laimos "throat, gullet." (Source).

"Philosophy will clip an Angel's wings,
Conquer all mysteries by rule and line,
Empty the haunted air, and gnomĂšd mine—
Unweave a rainbow, as it erewhile made
The tender-person'd Lamia melt into a shade."  -John Keats, "Lamia"

 
 
undead
 
1. (adj)  no longer alive but animated by a supernatural force, as a vampire or zombie.
2. (n) undead beings collectively (usually preceded by the)  (Source)
 
The first use of "undead" was c. 1400, but its use as a noun to mean vampires and other creatures dates from 1904. (Source)
 
"It's a reflex. Hear a bell, get food. See an undead, throw a knife. Same thing, really." -Ilona Andrews, Magic Bites
 
 
 
 
you had me at
 
 
 Exsanguinate is one of those words I just really like. I first heard it on the X-Files episode "Eve" and it stuck with me. Exsanguinate is a verb meaning to bleed to death. It can also mean to drain blood or make bloodless, and it was first used around 1800, coming from the Latin exsanguinatus meaning bloodless or deprived of blood (Source).
 
 "My first word for the new year was 'exsanguinate,' This was probably not a good omen." -Charlaine Harris, Dead to the World
 
 
 
 And of course, we can't forget the word that all the others relate to:
 
 
vampire
 

The earliest form of the word "vampire" goes back to only 1734, although stories of monsters that rise from the dead and attack the living can be found even in ancient times. The idea of blood-gorged walking corpses goes back at least to the 1100s. There's some debate as to where the word comes from, but it most likely has its roots in the Old Church Slavonic "opiri".  (Source)

"It was too much, the weight of it all was too much. Maybe that was why emotions were deadened in vampires; the alternative was to be overtaken by them, crippled, left stranded and isolated and trapped by unbearable sensation. How could they hunt if they felt sympathy, empathy, love for their prey? How could they—how could she—live with themselves?" AspasĂ­a S. Bissas, Love Lies Bleeding

Yes, that's a quote from my own book (I'm sneaky that way). Want to read more? Download Love Lies Bleeding and my other books, FREE...



Did I miss your favourite word about vampires? Let me know in the comments.

Cheers,
Aspasia S. Bissas

(Originally posted on my website.)

08 June 2020

Vampire's Garden: Love-Lies-Bleeding


Love Lies Bleeding Amaranth            
 

If you’ve read Love Lies Bleeding, you’ll know that main character Mara is both a vampire and a botanist. Trained in botany and herbalism when she was still human, she continues to study plants and have a garden. This post will be the first in a series exploring Mara’s plants.

Are you  interested in botany, gardening, or plant lore? So are some vampires…

Please note: Medicinal uses are given for historical interest only. Always consult a medical professional before diagnosing or treating yourself, or anyone else.

Latin name: Amaranthus caudatus

Common names: Love-Lies-Bleeding, Pendant Amaranth, Tassel Flower, Velvet Flower, Foxtail Amaranth

History: Native to South America, this and other varieties of Amaranthus were grown for their edible, protein-rich seeds. The Aztecs also used it in religious ceremonies, which led to the Spanish conquerors making its cultivation a capital offense (they still never managed to wipe it out). Some varieties were used to make a red dye, and betacyanins, which give Amaranthus their red colour, are still used to produce non-toxic food dyes. Medicinally, it has been used to treat swelling, ulcers, and diarrhea.

Victorian Language of Flowers Meaning: hopeless love or hopelessness

Cultivation: Annual. Easy to grow from seed, Love-Lies-Bleeding prefers full sun and is both drought and moisture tolerant. It grows to be 3 to 8 feet (1 to 2.5 metres) tall. Seeds can be started indoors and transplanted outside after the last frost (start in April to transplant in May). Sow or thin to 12 to 18 inches (30 to 45 cm). Can self sow but generally isn’t weedy.

Uses: Ornamental, cut flowers, edible (seeds and leaves).

Wildlife: Birds love the seeds–leave plants in the garden over winter for the birds.

Mara’s Uses: Following the Doctrine of Signatures, Mara considers Love-Lies-Bleeding to be a potential ingredient in her theoretical blood substitute.

Bonus: Mara’s full name is Amarantha, which shares a root and meaning with Amaranthus: “unwilting” or “unfading.”


Cheers,
AspasĂ­a S. Bissas

Further Reading
 
 
Download your FREE copies...
 
Love Lies Bleeding: SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKoboApple Books 

If you prefer a good paperback to an ebook, order Love Lies Bleeding from Bookshop – a portion of each sale goes directly to independent bookstores, as well as to myself. Thank you for supporting indie! ♥


Adaptive Seeds
The Sacramento Bee
Wikipedia
WebMD
Inhabitat
 
Originally posted on my website.